Whitey Harrison, with an old outrigger canoe at the family house in San Juan Capistrano, circa 1980. Craig Stecyk

Whitey Harrison, with an old outrigger canoe at the family house in San Juan Capistrano, circa 1980. Craig Stecyk

TALKING STORY IS A TRADITION IN HAWAII THAT GOES BACK TO... WELL, LONG AGO.

Mo’olelo is a Hawaiian word broken down into Mo’o meaning succession and olelo meaning words, hence, a succession of words or a story. Old Hawaii was an oral culture where history, wisdom and tradition were passed down by story telling. Today it has become all that again as well as just simply chatting and shooting the breeze. "BUT WHO DOESN’T LOVE A GOOD STORY?"

 

FROM THE BEGINNING, THE ADVENTURES HAVE BEEN MEMORABLE.

Growing up in the extraordinary place that was Hawai'i in the 1950s and 1960s. Playing a part in the shortboard revolution of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Living the dream in the Country before it was ever called the North Shore. Experiencing the awe, fear and ultimate satisfaction of finding the tube in the early days at the Pipeline. Traveling for surf throughout the world: to the original surf camp at G-Land, the exotic islands off Sumatra and especially to the magic island of Bali, Indonesia - before it became a popular surf destination. Experiencing the beginnings of windsurfing on Maui, the early years of snowboarding and tow-in surfing at Jaws.

But it is the people that surfing molds into truly unique individuals, each with his own special story, that stand out. Many of these surfers who helped create the surfing world of today are unknown for their contributions, or are already forgotten.


Surfing is a deeply wonderful thing - anytime, anywhere and any way.

- Gerry